Here are some amazing of our human body that will definitely blow your mind away


Scientists used to believe that your brain stopped physically evolving in early childhood but new research has shown that keeps changing well into middle age.

Brain scans have shown that prefrontal cortex – the area just behind your forehead – continues to change shape in your 30s and 40s.

The discovery is particularly significant as the prefrontal cortex is a key area of the brain and is often thought said to be key to what makes us human.

It is said to be involved with decision making, social interaction and many other personality traits.

Professor Sarah-Jayne Blakemore, a neuroscientist at University College London, revealed the new thinking at the British Neuroscience Christmas symposium in London.

She said: “Until about 10 years ago we pretty much assumed that the human brain stopped developing in early childhood.

“But we now understand from brain imaging that that is far from the truth and that many human brains keep on developing for many decades.

“The area of the brain that goes through the most protracted development is the prefrontal cortex right at the front of the brain.

“It is the part of the brain that is involved in high cognitive function such as decision making, planning and social behaviour. It is also to do with understanding other people.

“It starts develop in early childhood, is reorganised in late adolescence and continues developing well into the 30s and 40s.

“It is the part of the brain that makes us human.”



“Music induces a continuous, dynamic—and to some extent predictable—change in the cardiovascular system,” said Luciano Bernardi, a professor of medicine at the University of Pavia in Italy and lead author on the paper published in the journalCirculation, in a statement. Understanding the mechanisms of how swelling crescendos and deflating decrescendos affect our physiology, he suggests, could lead to potential new therapies for stroke and other conditions.



The heart is a biomechanical machine that works relentlessly day in and day out. Biomechanical energy is one of the main forms of energy generated in our biological system, aka the human body. Your heart creates enough energy every day to drive a truck for 20 miles. This energy can be effectively harnessed and converted to electricity. Scientists have harvested this energy from the heart to power artificial pacemakers.







Within three days of death, the enzymes that once digested your dinner begin to eat you. Ruptured cells become food for living bacteria in the gut, which release enough noxious gas to bloat the body and force the eyes to bulge outward.



A scene in Indiana Jones’s Temple of Doom shows a heart continuing to beat after it has been ripped out of man’s chest.  As remarkable as this seems, it can happen.  Your heart has its own electrical system that causes your heart to beat, and as long as your heart continues to receive oxygen, it will continue to beat … even if it’s separated from the rest of your body.



People who aren’t malnourished should have 4-5 grams of iron present in their bodies. Most of this (about 2.5 g) can be found in the red blood cells in the hemoglobin; the rest is dispersed in small amounts among the rest of the body’s cells, with higher concentrations in the bone marrow, liver, and spleen.

This box of nails from Home Depot contains 750 1.5-inch long nails and weighs 5 lbs. That’s approximately 2,268 grams of metal, for just over 3 grams per nail. Of course, these nails, like most nails, are made of steel instead of pure iron. Iron nails have a tendency to rust.



The megapixel equivalent numbers below refer to the spatial detail in an image that would be required to show what the human eye could see when you view a scene. 90 degrees * 60 arc-minutes/degree * 1/0.3 * 90 * 60 * 1/0.3 = 324,000,000 pixels (324 megapixels). 120 * 120 * 60 * 60 / (0.3 * 0.3) = 576 megapixels.



Your brain contains about 100 billion microscopic cells called neurons—so many it would take you over 3,000 years to count them all. Whenever you dream, laugh, think, see, or move, it’s because tiny chemical and electrical signals are racing between these neurons along billions of tiny neuron highways. Believe it or not, the activity in your brain never stops. Countless messages zip around inside it every second like a supercharged pinball machine. Your neurons create and send more messages than all the phones in the entire world. And while a single neuron generates only a tiny amount of electricity, all your neurons together can generate enough electricity to power a low-wattage bulb.





The eye is not a single frame snapshot camera. It is more like a video stream. The eye moves rapidly in small angular amounts and continually updates the image in one’s brain to “paint” the detail. We also have two eyes, and our brains combine the signals to increase the resolution further. We also typically move our eyes around the scene to gather more information. Because of these factors, the eye plus brain assembles a higher resolution image than possible with the number of photoreceptors in the retina. So the megapixel equivalent numbers below refer to the spatial detail in an image that would be required to show what the human eye could see when you view a scene.

Consider a view in front of you that is 90 degrees by 90 degrees, like looking through an open window at a scene. The number of pixels would be
90 degrees * 60 arc-minutes/degree * 1/0.3 * 90 * 60 * 1/0.3 = 324,000,000 pixels (324 megapixels).
At any one moment, you actually do not perceive that many pixels, but your eye moves around the scene to see all the detail you want. But the human eye really sees a larger field of view, close to 180 degrees. Let’s be conservative and use 120 degrees for the field of view. Then we would see
120 * 120 * 60 * 60 / (0.3 * 0.3) = 576 megapixels.
The full angle of human vision would require even more megapixels. This kind of image detail requires A large format camera to record.



Depending on how you divide up muscle groups, just to take a single step you use somewhere in the neighborhood of 200 muscles. That’s a lot of work for the muscles considering most of us take about 10,000 steps a day.